May 01

Abbott Land Records Wexford County Michigan Liber 4 page 197

I am posting information gleaned from land records in the areas where our family’s ancestors resided. You can read more about this project in the overview. You may also check my deed record listing, which I will update frequently, but probably not every day. This group pertain to early residents of Wexford County, Michigan with the surname Abbott. Papa’s second great-grandmother was Mary Jane Abbott; I have undertaken a study of the early Abbott deeds to look for connections to her and her family. I know that her brother Erastmus D. [E.D.] Abbott was in Wexford County, but have not connected any others to her at this time.

 

Date: 6 April 1875
Liber: 4
Page: 197
Location: Wexford Co MI
Grantor: Anson D. Hanna and Eliza E. Hanna his wife of Wexford Co MI
Grantee: Erasmus Abbott
Witnesses: H.B. Sturtevant, J.N. Hanna
Type of deed: Warranty
Rec’d and recording: 7 April 1878
Clerk/registrar: Sturtavant
Location of land: Antioch, Wexford, MI
Consideration: $225
Notes: Erasmus D. Abbott was Susie Burdick’s uncle, and Papa’s second great granduncle
Description: Starting at a point 38 rods east and 22 rods south of the NW corner of Section 6 T23N R11W and running south 8 rods, west 4 rods, north 8 rods and east 4 rods to the start

This piece of property is in or near Sherman, an early settlement in, and the first seat of Wexford County. I do not understand why the deed was not recorded until 1878, and I do not know if Abbott actually lived on this land, or used it in any way. I did fiddle around waste spend quite a bit of time looking at the area on today’s standard maps of Wexford County. The area is currently divided into lots, but none exactly match the description given on this deed, even after converting rods to feet. The best I can say is that the lot is located south of 14 mile road and north of East Church Street, between Sherman Street on the west and Nelson Street on the east. The land may have been redivided in some way, since no description starts 8 rods (627 ft) east and 22 rods (363 ft) south of the section corner. A rod is 16.5 feet.

It is probably worth noting that this is a fractional section, where allowances were made for the earth’s curvature. Some other strange things seem to have been done with the survey, you can see that the forty on the edge of the section is actually 42.20, the the next two forts toward the east are 44 acres each. I would check out the edge of Hanover township that meets Antioch to see what the acreages there are, but I would get lost looking at fooling around studying the maps and spend another half hour hour doing something that really wouldn’t benefit my search for Abbotts in Wexford County. As illustrated on a portion of the old 1889 atlas1, the land is approximately where the red dot is.

4-197

  1. E.L. Hayes & Co., Atlas of Wexford County, Michigan / compiled by Eli L. Hayes from government surveys, county and township records, and personal investigations and observations , Eli L. Hayes, (Chicago, Ill.: E.L. Hayes & Co., 1889), page 37; digital images, The University of Michigan. Michigan County Histories and Atlases. http://name.umdl.umich.edu/3928170.0001.001 : accessed 28 April 2010.

Apr 30

Funeral Card Friday – Alec James Sparks

I am sharing funeral cards on Friday, following a Facebook meme which you an see here. I know the meme in for the first Friday, but sometimes I just like an idea sooo much…

Alec Sparks funeral card

Alec Sparks was a neighbor of Papa’s family for many years, and of Papa and I when we lived in the Cadillac area. You can see that he was born in Antioch Township, Wexford County, an area where Papa’s family also had roots. Alec James Sparks was the son of James Sparks and Minnie Sayer, the second of their nine children, and the oldest to survive childhood. He loved music, and he loved to dance. He was a carpet layer, at least for some part of his career, and M-in-L sometimes asked him for advice on flooring.

When our children were small, I remember taking them off to pick berries, or hunt mushrooms. We often saw Alec walking along the road, getting his exercise.

Apr 29

Treasure Chest Thursday – Dad’s Shoe Shine Kit

The other day I got side tracked from a little job making a couple of pairs of PJ pants for GD1, and cleaned off the shelves in the back storage room. In the process I also sorted patterns, but that is another story. A few things surfaced, which I photographed for Treasure Chest posts.

shine1

I remember this shoe shine kit well. I have no idea how I ended up with it, but it contains enough sentimental value to almost bring tears to my eyes. Dad was an undertaker, I guess I have mentioned that enough times. In the good old days undertakers and really all businessmen, wore suits, hats, overcoats, gloves, and leather shoes. There were rubbers or zip front rubber overshoes for winter. Does anyone else remember the rubbers? they were very flexible, like rubber gloves, and fit tightly over shoes. I can close my eyes and see every adult in my childhood life leaning on the wall near the door, either putting the rubbers on, or peeling them off.

Dad polished his shoes with regularity, but I do not remember if it was a certain day of the week, or just when they needed it. Dad’s extra shoes (the ones that were not on his feet) lived on shoe trees, which looked like this:

shine2

They adjust from longer to shorter by putting the handle on using the correct holes. First he wiped the shoes off, then he put on the polish. For the uninitiated, the polish came in a glass bottle, with a fleecy dabber attached to the underside of the lid with a wire stick type thing. I can see him carefully spreading the polish on the shoes, holding not the shoes, but the handle of the shoe tree on which they were installed. He was meticulous, there was never any polish on the soles of the shoes, or on the floor, or his hands. The shoes were set aside on a piece of newspaper to dry, then shined with the brush.

If you look at the handle, you can see it serves a dual purpose. It is ribbed, therefore not slippery. You can sit in a chair, put your foot up on the handle, and brush your shoes off, or shine them with a rag. I think only the shoe trees, the brush and the box are original. The polish is all newer, and I have stored it in the kit.

This post was written following the “Treasure Chest Thursday” theme over at Geneabloggers.

Apr 28

Abbott Land Records, Wexford County, Michigan Liber 3 page 209

I am posting information gleaned from land records in the areas where our family’s ancestors resided. You can read more about this project in the overview. You may also check my deed record listing, which I will update frequently, but probably not every day. This group pertain to early residents of Wexford County, Michigan with the surname Abbott. Papa’s second great-grandmother was Mary Jane Abbott; I have undertaken a study of the early Abbott deeds to look for connections to her and her family. I know that her brother Erastmus D. [E.D.] Abbott was in Wexford County, but have not connected any others to her at this time.

Date: 18 Oct 1875
Liber: 3
Page: 209
Location: Traverse City, MI
Grantor: The United States
Grantee: John R. Abbott
Witnesses: ——
Type of deed: US Land Grant
Rec’d and recording: 18 Oct 1875
Clerk/registrar: Perry Hannah
Location of land: Colfax, Wexford Co, MI
Consideration: $8 (second payment)
Notes:
Description: SE 1/4 of Sec 22 T23N R10W

This land is more in proximity to Papa’s Abbott and Burdick ancestors’ land. On this section of the old 1889 atlas1, the land purchased by John R. Abbott is marked in red. Papa’s Fenton and Fellows ancestors owned land within the blue outlined area, a little later on. Ross P. Fenton was the grandson of Mary Jane Abbott. The land owned by George Washington Burdick and wife Mary Jane Abbott was further north near the township line. The land marked “Geo Burdick” on this map was owned by the “other” Burdick family, with whom I have not found a connection.

3-209

  1. E.L. Hayes & Co., Atlas of Wexford County, Michigan / compiled by Eli L. Hayes from government surveys, county and township records, and personal investigations and observations , Eli L. Hayes, (Chicago, Ill.: E.L. Hayes & Co., 1889), page 29; digital images, The University of Michigan. Michigan County Histories and Atlases. http://name.umdl.umich.edu/3928170.0001.001 : accessed 28 April 2010.

Apr 27

Tuesday’s Tools – Saving an Image from Seeking Michigan

There are a host of professional genealogists who offer tips, shortcuts and tricks to make life easier for the rest of us. Along the way, each of us picks up tidbits of knowledge which help us survive, or at least become our own standard way of accomplishing tasks. Once in a while, when I feel like it, in very irregular fashion, but almost always on Tuesday, I will tell you how I do something related to my genealogy. If this little effort helps you, share with others, so they can be helped to. We all have a little something in our heads that can make life easier for others. One warning: I am a PC user, and I know nothing about Apple, Mac or Linux operating systems and/or computers. This is from a PC user, for PC users.

Today’s tool is a method I used to save, rather than print, records on Seeking Michigan [www.seekingmichigan.org]. I usually prefer to save files, rather than print them, and Seeking Michigan does not have a “save” button.

I conducted a search, and am using my great-grandmother, Lena Yearnd. Here is the result of searching for “Yearnd”.

seeking1

I bet you wish you had an unusual last name now, don’t you? Clicking on the image produces this:

seeking2

I have some choices, but saving the image is not among them. Darn. I click the “printable version” link and see this:

seeking3

Here is the trick, click cancel instead of print, and the print box vanishes, leaving just the image. You can see only part of it, but do not worry. Right click on the image and select “save as” from the shortcut menu:

seeking4

Here is Lena’s death record on my desktop where I saved it:

seeking5

If you are as crazy as me, you won’t want to have the record with the thick black border. That huge black border is another reason not to print, it prints out, too. Just open the image in your favorite photo editing program, and then crop off the black. Some of the images on the site are slightly crooked, you can also straighten if needed.

Here is a link to the resulting file, and nice clean version of my great-grandmother’s death certificate. If you know of any Detman/Detmann families in Michigan between 1870 and 1920, please contact me. Although I have no evidence Lena immigrated with her family, one never knows.

Apr 26

Abbott Land Records, Wexford County, Michigan Liber 3 page 163

I am posting information gleaned from land records in the areas where our family’s ancestors resided. You can read more about this project in the overview. You may also check my deed record listing, which I will update frequently, but probably not every day. This group pertain to early residents of Wexford County, Michigan with the surname Abbott. Papa’s second great-grandmother was Mary Jane Abbott; I have undertaken a study of the early Abbott deeds to look for connections to her and her family. I know that her brother Erastmus D. [E.D.] Abbott was in Wexford County, but have not connected any others to her at this time. On a recent trip to Wexford County, I was able to survey the earliest two deed index books for the county, which resulted in eight deeds with surname Abbott.

Date: 9 July 1875
Liber: 3
Page: 163
Location: Traverse City, MI
Grantor: United States
Grantee: Ezra Abbott
Witnesses: —–
Type of deed: US Land Grant
Rec’d and recording: 22 Jul 1875 9 a.m.
Clerk/registrar: Perry Hannah
Location of land: Clam Lake Twp., Wexford County, MI
Consideration: application 4318, receipt 2208
Notes:
Description: E 1/2 of the SW 1/4 and the W 1/2 of the SE 1/4 all in Section 36 T21N R9W

This land grant not near from the Manton area where Mary Jane Abbott and husband George W. Burdick resided, to illustrate. The townships in Wexford County, Michigan are arranged like this:
wex twp

Only time will tell if Ezra Abbott has any relationship to our family. Here is the location of the land purchased by Ezra Abbott in 1875, illustrated on a small portion of the old 1889 Wexford County Atlas1, located in the extreme southeastern portion of Wexford County. In 1889 both portions of the land were owned by one individual.

3-163

  1. E.L. Hayes & Co., Atlas of Wexford County, Michigan / compiled by Eli L. Hayes from government surveys, county and township records, and personal investigations and observations , Eli L. Hayes, (Chicago, Ill.: E.L. Hayes & Co., 1889), page 15; digital images, The University of Michigan. Michigan County Histories and Atlases. http://name.umdl.umich.edu/3928170.0001.001 : accessed 2 November 2009.

Apr 24

Fellows Family Land Records,Newaygo County, Michigan Liber 29 page 363

I am posting information gleaned from land records in the areas where our family’s ancestors resided. You can read more about this project in the overview . This group pertain to Papa’s Fellows ancestors who resided in Newaygo County, Michigan.

Date: 6 Oct 1905
Liber: 59
Page: 363
Location: Wexford Co., MI
Grantor: Belle Fellows of Manton, Wexford County MI surviving joint tenant of Henry H. and Belle Fellows.
Grantee: Samuel D. Clay
Witnesses: Frank E. Angeline, Josephine Paquette
Type of deed: Warranty
Rec’d and recording: 7 Oct 1905
Clerk/registrar: Phillips
Location of land: Denver township and village, Newaygo Co., MI
Consideration: $300 and other valuable consideration
Notes:
Description: SW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 Sec 22 T14N R14W and lots 4,5,6,8,9,10,11,12,13 a cording to the village plat of Denver.

Henry H. Fellows died 19 September 1905 at the hospital in Big Rapids, Mecosta Co., Michigan. Belle had the need for some cash; apparently she sold her Newaygo County property to obtain it.

The village of Denver was located just north of the 40 acres owned by Henry and Belle. You can click on the thumbnail to better see the location of the land is illustrated on the Ashland Township map from the old Newaygo County Atlas1 .

59-363

 

 

  1. C. O. Titus, Atlas of Newaygo County, Michigan / compiled and drawn for the publisher by E. L. Hayes ; H. H. Avery, assistant, W. B. Patterson, assistant. (Philadelphia, PA : C.O. Titus c1880), page 57, The University of Michigan. Michigan County Histories and Atlases. http://name.umdl.umich.edu/3927793.0001.001 : accessed 15 February 2010.

Apr 23

Funeral Card Friday — Edna Rose Fellows

I am sharing funeral cards on Fridays, following a Facebook meme which you an see here.  I know the meme was for “First Fridays, but I have quite a few, and I like to move ahead when I hear a good idea. Today’s card is from the service of Papa’s grandmother, Edna Rose Fellows. You can click to enlarge the card.

Edna Fellows funeral card

Edna Rose Fellows was born on 2 December 1892 in Newaygo County, Michigan. Her parents were Henry H. Fellows and wife Belle Lamunion. Edna was the seventh child of Henry and Belle.

Edna married Ross P. Fenton on 11 Sept 1909, and they raised a family of six children. You can see a photo of Edna’s final resting place in my cemetery series.

Apr 22

Treasure Chest Thursday, Buenilum

After my Mother passed away, S-Dad waited a while, then began hunting for a place closer to his children. As he packed up in preparation for the move, a number of things came to the surface, and traveled down the road to Granny’s house. Two of those items are today’s subject.

I remember this plate and pitcher being around when I was young. The pitcher was used for water at holiday dinners, or on other occasions when we had company. Like a lot of folks, we used the faucet when there was no company.

both

The maker is the Boehner-Wanner Company of Norwalk, Connecticut. Buenilum is a trade name used for the hammered aluminum pieces. The company was started by Frederick Boehner Wanner, you can read a little more about him here. The mark on the bottom of both is a castle with the initials B.W. and the word “Buenilum”.

mark

The pitcher is about 9.5 inches high. I did not measure the amount it can hold, I think it is about two quarts. The serving tray is 14.5 inches across, excluding the handles. I believe there was a glass liner that fit into the depression, it has not survived.

These days, I have been working hard to get my old photos scanned. Check out this one I came across recently, with the Buenilum pitcher on the table.

001

In the back left, my grandmother, Winnie (Kaiser) Yearnd, at the end of the table, brother number 1, then me with the dirty face, then my Dad. Mom must have been taking the picture. Maybe I will put the pitcher on the table tonight.

This post was written following the “Treasure Chest Thursday” theme over at Geneabloggers.

Apr 21

Fellows Family Land Records,Newaygo County, Michigan Liber 65 page 582

I am posting information gleaned from land records in the areas where our family’s ancestors resided. You can read more about this project in the overview . This group pertain to Papa’s Fellows ancestors who resided in Newaygo County, Michigan.

Date: 22 May 1896
Liber: 65
Page: 582
Location: Newaygo Co., MI
Grantor: Henry H. Fellows & Belle Fellows his wife of Grant, Newaygo Co., MI
Grantee: Albert G. Day of Grant village & County of Newaygo
Witnesses: John Bailey, John A. McKinley
Type of deed: Warranty
Rec’d and recording: 25 May 1896
Clerk/registrar: Carter
Location of land: Grant Twp., Newaygo Co., MI
Consideration: $25 and other valuable consideration
Notes:
Description: NE 1/4 of NE 1/4 Sec 7 T11N R12W

This deed states, “Reserving all crops now in the ground that can be harvested before 1 November 1896 and possession of the house until 1 November 1896.”

This appears to be when Henry and Belle left Newaygo County and headed north. They would have been following the work available in the lumber woods. Although the family farmed, the men also worked in the woods in the winter. Belle and Henry and their children appear on the 1900 census of Orange Township, Kalkaska County, Michigan in the home of George McAfee. Henry was a “hired man”, and Belle and their oldest daughter Bertha are listed as servants. The other children who were old enough are “attending school.”

The location of this land is illustrated on the Ashland Township map from the old Newaygo County Atlas1 . Click thumbnail if you wish to enlarge the map.

65-582

  1. C. O. Titus, Atlas of Newaygo County, Michigan / compiled and drawn for the publisher by E. L. Hayes ; H. H. Avery, assistant, W. B. Patterson, assistant. (Philadelphia, PA : C.O. Titus c1880), page 27, The University of Michigan. Michigan County Histories and Atlases. http://name.umdl.umich.edu/3927793.0001.001 : accessed 15 February 2010.

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