«

»

Feb 18

Belle’s Box – 142

This entry is part 144 of 342 in the series Belle's Box

Read about this series of posts, regarding items in a box originally owned by Belle (Lamunion) Fellows Tinker here. The cast of characters is located here. And, there is an accounting of people about whom I have little information here.

A Greeting

As the sunshine
paints the flowers
A gay and lovely hue
so Life is made
much brighter
When I remember you

Postmark is March 1929, Mich, but the exact date and city are illegible. addressee:

Mrs. Belle Tinker
Paris
Mich.

142b

At the top:

All well and
hope you are to

Dear mother
Well you can come
home the car in
to our place is good
Geo and Andie did
not come home
don’t know why. We
have sent for our car
license come up
Edna

M-in-L mentions Uncle Andy from time to time, so I’ve heard it a lot, but I had to look up “Uncle Andy”. He was Alfred “Andy” Burgess, husband of Edna’s sister, Hazel Fellows. Andy and George Fenton, Edna’s brother, must have been somewhere working. Belle and Charlie were in working in Paris, Michigan, this isn’t the first card addressed there.

F-in-L used to tell about the long winters, when the roads in the area weren’t plowed. Many of them probably were not much better than what we call two-tracks today. The equipment to clear the roads just didn’t exist, and there was more important work, logging, caring for animals, and getting in wood. Everyone just waited till spring to use cars, it wasn’t possible to drive during most winters. At this time, not everyone had cars, and it seems that the expense of a license was put off till it was possible to use a car if you had one.

George Fenton was born on October 31, 1912, so he was just seventeen in 1929. These days, we don’t send our seventeen year old sons off to work somewhere all winter; times have changed. George was no doubt quite safe in the company of Burgess, who was forty in 1929. M-in-L was born in 1923, and her youngest sibling in 1928, so Edna’s family of six was complete in 1929. The two oldest children were probably working at least some, and the younger ones helped out at home.

Series NavigationBelle’s Box – 141Belle’s Box – 143